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Wednesday, 27 June 2018 00:00

Do your Child's Feet Hurt?

Have your child's feet been examined lately?

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Research has shown there are notable differences between walking and running shoes. These may include having thicker soles to allow for additional stability. The technique of walking differs between the two types of shoes. Walkers tend to land on their heels as opposed to runners who appear to land flat-footed. Stability is often increased as a result of the design of the shoes, and this may help to guide the foot in a forward motion. For both types of shoes, it’s important to have ample room for the toes to move about, in addition to having adequate flexibility that meet the demands of your chosen sport. Please consult with a podiatrist for additional information about the differences between walking and running shoes.

For more information about walking shoes versus running shoes, consult with Dr. Ella Lehman from Pennsylvania. Our doctor can measure your feet to determine what your needs are and help you find an appropriate pair of footwear.

Foot Health: The Differences between Walking & Running Shoes

There are great ways to stay in shape: running and walking are two great exercises to a healthy lifestyle. It is important to know that running shoes and walking shoes are not interchangeable. There is a key difference on how the feet hit the ground when someone is running or walking. This is why one should be aware that a shoe is designed differently for each activity.

You may be asking yourself what the real differences are between walking and running shoes and the answers may shock you.

Differences

Walking doesn’t involve as much stress or impact on the feet as running does. However, this doesn’t mean that you should be any less prepared. When you’re walking, you land on your heels and have your foot roll forward. This rolling motion requires additional support to the feet.

Flexibility – Walking shoes are designed to have soft, flexible soles. This allows the walker to push off easily with each step.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Pittsburgh and North Huntingdon, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 18 June 2018 00:00

Common Foot Ailments in Pregnant Women

It’s common for pregnant women to complain about foot pain or swollen feet. Developing flat feet is equally as common, and this is typically a result of the excess weight that is gained from the developing fetus. Research has shown that this may affect a women’s center of gravity, which may alter overall posture. Despite the fact that most of these uncomfortable ailments may diminish after pregnancy, there are ways to minimize the discomfort they cause. These may include elevating the feet above the heart, which may aid in improving circulation in the early stages of pregnancy. It is beneficial to eat a well-balanced and healthy diet, which involves lower salt content. This can possibly eliminate excess fluid from accumulating. It’s also suggested to sleep on your side rather than on your back. Practicing gentle exercises may aid the decrease of fluid retention. Please consult with a podiatrist for additional information on how pregnancy affects your feet.

Pregnant women with swollen feet can be treated with a variety of different methods that are readily available. For more information about other cures for swollen feet during pregnancy, consult with Dr. Ella Lehman from Pennsylvania. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

What foot problems can arise during pregnancy?

One problem that can occur is overpronation, which occurs when the arch of the foot flattens and tends to roll inward.  This can cause pain and discomfort in your heels while you’re walking or even just standing up, trying to support your baby.  

Another problem is edema, or swelling in the extremities. This often affects the feet during pregnancy, but tends to occur in the later stages. 

How can I keep my feet healthy during pregnancy?

  • Wearing orthotics can provide extra support for the feet and help distribute weight evenly
  • Minimize the amount of time spent walking barefoot
  • Wear shoes with good arch support
  • Wear shoes that allow for good circulation to the feet
  • Elevate feet if you experience swelling
  • Massage your feet
  • Get regular, light exercise, such as walking, to promote blood circulation to the feet

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Pittsburgh and North Huntingdon, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Wednesday, 13 June 2018 00:00

Before you start dancing...

 

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Recent studies may have found that wearing certain shoes that have a heel may benefit your feet and posture than by wearing flat shoes which may not have an arch. Choosing shoes that have a wider heel may aid in maintaining proper balance and wearing shoes with a shorter heel may help in keeping excess pressure off the toes. For those people who enjoy wearing shoes with an extremely high heel, it's advised to choose shoes that have a chunky heel as opposed to very thin heels. This can help in preventing possible damage to the foot, including the formation of hammer toes or blisters. It’s suggested to wear high heels for short durations at a time which may allow the feet to become accustomed to the desired heel size. If you have questions about how to choose a proper high heel that may benefit the feet, please speak with a podiatrist.  

High heels have a history of causing foot and ankle problems. If you have any concerns about your feet or ankles, contact Dr. Ella Lehman from Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Effects of High Heels on the Feet

High heels are popular shoes among women because of their many styles and societal appeal.  Despite this, high heels can still cause many health problems if worn too frequently.

Which parts of my body will be affected by high heels?

  • Ankle Joints
  • Achilles Tendon – May shorten and stiffen with prolonged wear
  • Balls of the Feet
  • Knees – Heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
  • Back – They decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain.  The vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What kinds of foot problems can develop from wearing high heels?

  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Plantar Fasciitis

How can I still wear high heels and maintain foot health?

If you want to wear high heeled shoes, make sure that you are not wearing them every day, as this will help prevent long term physical problems.  Try wearing thicker heels as opposed to stilettos to distribute weight more evenly across the feet.  Always make sure you are wearing the proper shoes for the right occasion, such as sneakers for exercising.  If you walk to work, try carrying your heels with you and changing into them once you arrive at work.  Adding inserts to your heels can help cushion your feet and absorb shock. Full foot inserts or metatarsal pads are available. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Pittsburgh and North Huntingdon, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 04 June 2018 00:00

What Causes Sever’s Disease?

The ailment known as Sever’s disease affects the heels in children and teenagers. It typically occurs when the growth plate in the heel has been injured, often due to physical activity. It generally happens at a time when rapid growth is experienced, and will commonly cease by age 15. Research has shown that the occurrence of Sever’s disease may be increased if certain conditions are apparent. These may include a flat or elevated arch, obesity which may put additional weight on the growth plate, or a condition referred to as short leg syndrome. If you notice your child is limping or is experiencing heel pain, they may have Sever’s disease. After a proper diagnosis is performed, treatment can generally begin by ceasing the activity that caused this condition. Additionally, practicing correct foot stretches may aid in obtaining moderate relief. Please speak with a podiatrist if you think your child is affected by Sever’s disease.

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see Dr. Ella Lehman at Pennsylvania. Our doctor can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain asscoiatied with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Pittsburgh and North Huntingdon, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

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